The Four Elements in Astrology

I tend to preach a fair amount about the classical Four Elements of Earth, Air, Fire, and Water. I think it’s a really important system in metaphysics that can be extremely helpful in getting a handle on various other symbols.

For example, if you know that two Signs of the Zodiac are both Fire Signs, and you know the basics of what Fire is all about, symbolically-speaking, then you’ll understand that these Fire Signs will share some common traits. They’ll also have their definite differences – Aries is not the same thing as Leo, and neither is interchangeable with Sagittarius – but it’s a fair bet that these Fire Signs will be concerned with the energetic level of existence, and they’ll share themes of a Fire-y nature, such as passion, will, adventure, charisma, possibly anger issues, maybe lust issues of some kind, and the management of life-force itself.

Elemental associations for the Signs are pretty well-known, sometimes even to non-astrologers (they may not know exactly what these associations mean, but it’s not uncommon for a non-astrologer to at least be able to report the fact that their natal Sun lies in, say, a Water Sign…).

Here’s how those associations play out along the Zodiac:

Sign

Element

Aries

Fire

Taurus

Earth

Gemini

Air

Cancer

Water

Leo

Fire

Virgo

Earth

Libra

Air

Scorpio

Water

Sagittarius

Fire

Capricorn

Earth

Aquarius

Air

Pisces

Water

As is usually the case, though, the Houses are less acknowledged and understood. Just like the Signs of the Zodiac, the 12 Houses are also assigned associations with the Four Elements. You might notice a pattern developing here:

House

Element

First

Fire

Second

Earth

Third

Air

Fourth

Water

Fifth

Fire

Sixth

Earth

Seventh

Air

Eighth

Water

Ninth

Fire

Tenth

Earth

Eleventh

Air

Twelfth

Water

The same sequence of Elements that repeats itself three times over as it runs alongside the Signs – Fire, Earth, Air, Water – does the same exact thing next to the Houses. If you can memorize that F-E-A-W sequence, you’ll have a handy mnemonic device for keeping all of these Elemental associations pinned down…and you’ll also then have a pretty great wellspring of basic meanings to draw from as you do your chart interpretations.

It can be really informative to get a sense of which Elements are emphasized in a given person’s chart, versus which ones are kind of thinly represented.

Heavy emphasis on an Element can indicate great skill with the business of that Element…but it might also flag the possibility of over-reliance on that Element. If you have a platoon of Planets placed in Water Signs and Houses, you might be terrific at the stuff of Water, such as emotions and romance and mystic/psychic phenomena…but you might also tend to be a dreamer, a space cadet, an addictive or escapist type, or a slave to your feelings. And you might have a tendency to try to force everything into a Water-y context, even when that’s not an especially helpful thing to do.

On the flip-side, when an Element is underrepresented in a chart, it can signal a decided unfamiliarity with that layer of life, a discomfort with it, and maybe blind-spots in your ongoing experience of the world. A person with few Water placements at all may have trouble understanding their own emotions or dealing with the emotions of others. This person might also be clueless about romance, or they might lack imagination.

Here’s a simple exercise you can try out so as to see if Elemental analysis resonates for you as a valid technique… Look at your own chart. Make a table, and then tally up your own Planetary placements one at a time. For each Planet you’re tracking, tally its Sign and House Elements. For example, if you have your natal Venus in Cancer in your Eleventh House, then this Planet is in a Water Sign and an Air House. Run through the Planets and record each result. When you’re done, take a look at:

  1. What’s the Elemental breakdown for the Signs in your chart?
  2. What’s the Elemental breakdown for the Houses in your chart?
  3. What’s the Elemental breakdown when you add them all together?
  4. Do the results feel like they map accurately onto the you that you know?

For that last question, just take an honest look at yourself. Say that through this exercise, you discover that your chart shows that you have a preponderance of Air energy and maybe very little Water. A breakdown like that could easily translate to you being very intellectual in your approach to life, while possibly being a bit emotionally detached (that is, you lead with your brain, not your heart). So you’d then need to really examine the question of whether or not that description does accurately apply to you…

You shouldn’t feel pressured to make this the cornerstone of your practice or anything…but working with the Four Elements can add a lot to chart analysis. It can also be especially helpful when you’re in the beginning stages of learning: Astrology is complex, and getting a lock on four symbols (the Elements) is much easier than learning 12 (the Signs), another 12 (the Houses), or all 24 of those at one go.

Fire, Earth, Air, Water…Fire, Earth, Air, Water…Fire, Earth, Air, Water…

ASTROLOGY TIP: A Clue for Reading Charts

IMG_5229
In the last days of WWII, a British couple named Anthony and Elva Pratt conceived of a new board game designed as a murder mystery. It was published a few years later in England as “Cluedo,” and in North America as “Clue.” The game asked players to deduce the three main components of a murder: whodunnit, what weapon did they do it with, and in which room of the old mansion where the action takes place did they do it?

Whodunnit? The game provides a small cast of suspects, any of whom could have committed the nefarious deed in question. Was it the alluring femme fatale, Miss Scarlet? The bookish Professor Plum? The aging hunter and imperialist, Colonel Mustard? Each has a distinctive personality and agenda.

What’d they do it with? This layer of the deduction offers insight into how the crime was committed. Did it involve the bloodless, up close and personal use of the rope? Or the more detached, at-a-distance firing of the revolver? How about the bludgeoning brutality of the lead pipe? The weapon employed sheds light on the overall mood and flavor of the crime, and on the vibe of the perpetrator.

Where did they do it? Tudor Mansion is large, and comprised of plenty of possible stages for such a drama. Did the murder go down in the stately conservatory? The rather functional kitchen? The elegant ballroom? The setting of the felony tethers it more to concrete reality.

If you grasp how the three sets of Clue symbols – suspect, weapon, room – work together to produce a unique, three-coordinate, “who/how/where” combination from out of many possible such combinations…then you grasp Astrology.

If we set aside the murder part of the equation, the rest translates terrifically well. In Clue, we can say this: “The SUSPECTS act, the WEAPONS tell us how they act, and the ROOMS tell us where they act.”

You only have to swap in the appropriate terms to see how the three main sets of symbols work in Astrology: “The PLANETS act, the SIGNS tell us how they act, and the HOUSES tell us where they act.”

Congratulations – you’re pretty much ready to start reading astrological charts!

Are you interested in Astrology? Book a READING with me, or learn to read charts with me through PRIVATE LESSONS!

12 Astrological Houses Spread

IMG_3996In honor of the Full Moon last night, I busted out a big spread based on the 12 astrological Houses.  I’ll be doping out the meaning of this reading for days to come!

Interesting note: the numbered Minors (not counting the Aces) make up just under half of the deck.  So statistically speaking, in a spread of this size, I should have been able to expect maybe 5 or 6 numbered Minors to show up.  I ended up with 9.  It always stabs my attention in the eye when I get disproportionate results like this!

Holiday Astrology Special

AstrologyTo celebrate this holiday season, I’m now offering a special on all Astrology readings.

These readings can provide phenomenal insight for you, and they also make outstanding gifts for those close to you during this particular season.

These are in-depth, detailed readings for which I usually charge $100. However, for the duration of this special offer, I’ll be charging only $72USD.

Readings can be handled in real time (FaceTime, Skype, or phone) or entirely through email, according to your preferences.

All details can be found using the link below:

Book an Astrology reading with me now!

Astrology 101: Planetary Rulerships and Connections Among Houses

Here’s where we finally circle back around to the technique that I hinted at when we looked at the concept of Planetary Rulership a few posts back in this series…

I’ll start by refreshing that notion of rulership… Each Planet has a special affinity for one or two of the Signs – astrologers will say that the Planets “rule” these Signs with which they share these affinities. For example, the Moon rules the Sign of Cancer…the Sun rules Leo…Mars rules Aries… When placed in a Sign that it rules, a Planet can then perform its functions with a sort of enhanced purity and power. Such placements tend to take on added significance in a chart.

This table lays out the most commonly used modern rulership assignments:

Sign

Glyph

Modern Planetary Ruler

Glyph

Aries

Mars

Taurus

Venus

Gemini

Mercury

Cancer

Moon

Leo

Sun

Virgo

Mercury

Libra

Venus

Scorpio

Pluto (traditional Ruler = Mars)

Sagittarius

Jupiter

Capricorn

Saturn

Aquarius

Uranus (traditional Ruler = Saturn)

Pisces

Neptune (traditional Ruler = Jupiter)

We can also take this concept a step further, and use it to spot subtle but definite connections between various Houses. This works in one of two ways:

1. Cusp to Ruling Planet. Start by looking at the Sign that lies on the cusp of any given House that interests you (remember that the cusp is just the line that divides the House in question from the House that came before it).

Travel the chart of a traveler: Amelia Earhart's H9 cusp (1) lies in the Sign of Sagittarius (2)...Sagittarius is ruled by Jupiter (3), which lies in her H5...so her H9 affairs are powerfully connected to her H5 experiences and vice versa...
Travel the chart of a traveler, House cusp to Planet: Amelia Earhart’s H9 cusp (1) lies in the Sign of Sagittarius (2)…Sagittarius is ruled by Jupiter (3), which lies in her H5…so her H9 affairs are powerfully connected to her H5 experiences and vice versa (4)…

Let’s use vanished aviator Amelia Earhart as our example in all this. Since it’s the Ninth House that contains our experiences in the realm of long journeys, it might be interesting to examine H9 in the chart of this renowned world traveler.

As it turns out, Amelia Earhart’s Ninth House contains no Planets. As we’ve already discussed, this likely just means that the evolutionary, karmic business that she came into this lifetime to work on was happening in other arenas in her life…

But so how do we proceed here…? Remember that as we discussed in previous posts, even with no Planets to guide us in interpreting the workings of a specific House, we can still get some information about that House by studying its cusp. Here, Amelia Earhart’s H9 cusp lies in the Sign of Sagittarius. This is a Sign brimming with explorer-type energy, so it lines up extremely well with the House of Long Journeys. This Sign and this House are almost like two units in a set of matching luggage.

And here’s how we use the rulership technique to acquire a bit more applicable data… The Sign of Sagittarius is ruled by the Planet Jupiter. The idea here, then, is that the affairs of the House that has Sagittarius on its cusp (H9 in this example) will be connected to the affairs of the House in which Jupiter resides. In this same chart, that would be Ms. Earhart’s H5: the House of literal children, metaphorical “children” (the things we create), and joy in general. So we might conclude that some of Amelia Earhart’s truest joy (H5) was bound up in her long journeys (H9)…and possibly also that her long journeys (H9) served for her as “children” of a sort. She had no biological offspring of her own, but maybe each long journey was, for her, like a work of art that she crafted and brought into being (H5)…

2. Ruling Planet to Cusp. We can also work in the opposite direction. That is, we can start with any Planet… Next, anticipate that the House in which that Planet lies will be connected to the House whose cusp is located in the Sign that the same Planet rules.

Here’s another example from Ms. Earhart’s birth-chart that will hopefully make that more clear…

Same chart, Planet to cusp: Saturn (1) in Amelia Earhart's H7 rules Capricorn (2)...Capricorn in this chart contains the cusp of H10 (3)...so Ms. Earhart's H7 and H10 share a profound connection in her life...
Same chart, Planet to House cusp: Saturn (1) in Amelia Earhart’s H7 rules Capricorn (2)…Capricorn in this chart contains the cusp of H10 (3)…so Ms. Earhart’s H7 and H10 share a profound connection in her life…

Let’s pick one of the Planets that resides in her H7, the House of Partnerships. One of these is Saturn. There are other Planets in this House, but let’s keep this simple for now, and focus only on that one. Saturn happens to rule the Sign of Capricorn…and in Amelia Earhart’s chart, Capricorn contains the cusp of her Tenth House, which is the House of career, public reputation, the person’s mission in life.

This connection then implies that Amelia’s primary partnerships were inextricably linked with her life’s work, and her life’s work had major influence on her primary partnerships – probably more so than for most people. We know that her husband (an H7 partner) had to accept that their marriage would in many ways take a supporting and subordinate role to Amelia’s career (H10) as a famed aviator: she kept her own surname after they were wed, she refused to halt or even slow her work following the union, and he eventually ended up working in a flight school that she established in California. Meanwhile, her chosen career (H10) determined who quite a few of her other primary partners (H7) would be in her life (mostly drawn from her field of aviation). Again, we can trace connections flowing between two Houses due to this principle of Planetary Rulership connecting them.

So the technique here says that we can look at any House in a chart, and that House will be significantly connected in the life of the chart-holder to whichever House contains the Planetary Ruler of the Sign that lies on the cusp of that initial House that we were analyzing.

One last note… Sometimes you’ll find a Planet residing in the Sign of its own rulership. For instance, in Amelia Earhart’s chart, her Sun lies in Leo – the Sign that it rules – in her Fourth House. On the one hand, this doesn’t allow us to link her H4 affairs with another House in the chart using the technique described above…but on the other hand, it does tell us that H4 affairs were most likely of highly magnified importance in her life.

It can be easy to get a bit lost in this technique once you start to explore it. One House will lead you to another, to another, to yet more Houses… As you experiment with it, though, you’ll start to get a feel for when it can grant you valuable new insight, versus when it just has you scattering your energy like a cat chasing a laser-pointer’s red dot. Try playing around with it, and if you feel like it’s providing some helpful information, you can add it to your toolbox, and if it’s just distracting you, you can set it aside for later, or even discard it and focus on other techniques…

Astrology 101: Meet the Houses (Part 2)

The last post in this space introduced the first six of the 12 Houses; here, then, are the final six:

The Seventh House is where we go when we work at life through our most intense and meaningful partnerships...
The Seventh House is where we go when we work at life through our most intense and meaningful partnerships…

Seventh House. This House has often been referred to as the House of Marriage…but that name is a bit too specific, and therefore misleading. “House of Partnerships” would be more accurate. Consider how the House directly across from this one – the First House – is all about exploring one’s own identity in the world; put another way, H1 is the “House of I.” H7, though, requires working in partnerships – it’s the “House of You-and-I.” The Seventh House is where we go whenever we experience life in the arena of our close, one-to-one relationships. These can definitely include marriages or other committed, romantic relationships, but they can also take other forms, as well, such as business partnerships, artistic collaborations, or powerful social pairings. Planets placed here will tend to make their energies primarily known in this same sphere of partnerships. Major issues for people with strong H7 focuses can include the search for the right partners in life, the struggle to preserve their own sense of individuality within the contexts of partnerships, healthy intimacy, and the ability to function at times without having a partner to work with (working solo and working in larger groups can both feel difficult to H7 people).

Eighth House. This may be the darkest of the Houses, and it’s certainly one of the most difficult to grasp. Popular traditional names include both the cheery “House of Death” and the opportunistic-sounding “House of Other People’s Resources.” Basically, the Eighth House is a repository for all of the kinds of “grown-up” concepts that might give pause to a young adult leaving home for the very first time: mortality, taxes, sex (especially the darker and more complex varieties), corporations, inheritance, the occult, and the merging of souls. Those whose charts are marked with distinct H8 imprints may find that their major issues in life can include the commingling of their property with that of others, investments and the stock market, estate planning, encounters with soul-mates, experiences with taboo activities, and yes, sometimes pivotal brushes with death.

The Ninth House is the "House of Long Journeys" -- both literal, physical ones, and more figurative ones.  Pack a lunch, because H9 journeys take a while...
The Ninth House is the “House of Long Journeys” — both literal, physical ones, and more metaphorical ones. Pack a lunch, because H9 journeys take a while…

Ninth House. This is the fabled “House of Long Journeys.” Where its opposite number, H3, deals with a very local viewpoint, H9 is global in its scope. In H3, we look at individual trees, up close and personal, while in H9, we pull back to take in entire forests. The Ninth House is the sector of life we’re occupying when we take our long journeys, and these can be of the literal, physical kind that carry us to other regions far from home, or they may be of the more figurative type, including what we think of as “higher learning.” H9 experiences can include the acquisition of advanced degrees at the post-graduate scholastic level, and they can also include less formal exploration into such mind-expanding fields as philosophy, the law, and religion. Someone with a significant H9 presence may deal with such life issues and themes as the need or desire to travel a great deal, intense involvement in academia, contact with other cultures, publishing endeavors, or devotion to vast doctrines. H9 is all about expanding ourselves and our worldviews…

Tenth House. Just as the House on the opposite side of the chart – H4 – is the most private realm in our lives, H10 represents our most public arena. The Tenth House is where we go when we pursue our true life’s work – it describes our reputation, our career, our mission. It’s what we’re known for and remembered for even by people who have never met us. Questions about finding a suitable vocation and about one’s path in life should be addressed with at least some study of the Tenth House. Those whose charts showcase strong H10 placements may face challenges in life that revolve around the search for a proper career track, public opinion of that person, the balancing of the private life versus the public life, possible workaholic tendencies, the danger of being identified solely with the job the person holds, and the quest for fame.

Eleventh House. Here we arrive at what’s often called the “House of Friends.” H11 is where we find ourselves when we move among groups of people who share our interests, our values. Here we find our clubs, our special interest groups, our organizations whose members bond over some theme or concept. Here we have our wine-tasting groups, our book clubs, our Sunday hiking posses… If the opposite House, H5, is the place where “I express myself,” then H11 is where “We express ourselves together.” Another critical element of this House to always keep in mind, though, is that we get the most out of these kinds of organizations when they speak to some concept that we want to bring forth in our lives – that is, they capture things that we want to build into our futures. This is a very forward-looking realm. The Eleventh House is where we find our friends and our groups of like-minded individuals, and it’s also where we come in order to nurture our plans and hopes and aspirations for tomorrow. H11 involves our strategies and our goals, and the ways in which we attempt to bring them into being. Those who have charts characterized by strong H11 presences may find that some of their most important issues in life deal with the search for acceptance among peers, identification with clubs and organizations, dealing with “group-think,” success or failure in planning for the future, creating and executing workable strategies, and setting attainable goals.

The Twelfth House can definitely be a realm of delusion, illusion, and "self-undoing," as the ancient astrologers held...but it's also where we go when we explore consciousness itself, and when we commune with the Divine...
The Twelfth House can definitely be a realm of delusion, illusion, and “self-undoing,” as the ancient astrologers held…but it’s also where we go when we explore consciousness itself, and when we commune with the Divine…

Twelfth House. To the traditional astrologer, this was some rather gloomy terrain: H12 was a “House of Troubles,” a dour landscape dotted with hospitals, asylums, monasteries, and prisons. A more broad-based view, however, reveals that this very profound sphere of existence has as many “good” elements making it up as “bad.” Here we find our spirituality. This is the House that contains our mysticism, our psychic experiences, our dreams. The Twelfth House is the House of consciousness itself, of our existential viewpoint, and of our relationship to whatever it is that we consider “Divine” – this is where we come when we gaze out at the Universe, and seek to understand what It might feel about us when It gazes right back. If we do a poor job navigating this realm, we run the risk of becoming mired in despair…but if we navigate it well, then this is where we find transcendence. People who have potent H12 signatures in their charts may find their lives stamped by such concepts as addiction, escapism, self-sabotage, sacrifice, a fascination with altered states of consciousness, mystical and spiritual experiences, and a strong connection to the dream-state.

And that’s the set of the 12 Houses! Always try to keep in mind that the Planets are what we do…the Signs are how we do it…and the Houses are where in our lives we do it…

Astrology 101: Meet the Houses (Part 1)

Birth-chart of the Dalai Lama -- the Houses can be seen here as the dozen "pie-slices" numbered 1-12 into which the interior of the chart is divided...
Birth-chart of the Dalai Lama — the Houses can be seen here as the dozen “pie-slices” numbered 1-12 into which the interior of the chart is divided…

Now we’ve discussed the overall function that the Houses perform in Astrology: while the Planets describe what someone does, and the Signs tell us about how they do it…the Houses point out where all this doing of stuff will occur in that person’s life.

The next step is in grasping that just as with the Planets and the Signs, each symbol in the set of the Houses has its own “personality,” and no two are alike. You need to get a handle on what concepts go with which House…so let’s meet them! To keep things realistically chewable, we’ll cover six of the 12 Houses in this post, and the other six will get their turn on stage in the next one…

Oh, and as a handy abbreviation system, I’ve adopted the convention of shortening any given House to a designation in the form of “H#” when I refer to them. So, for example, the Second House is H2, or the Eighth House is H8. Forewarned = forearmed…

Even when you're meeting someone for the very first time, you get some initial sense of part of their overall persona.  This social mask is the business of the First House, and though it's an outer layer of personality, and much lies beneath it, it still conveys a lot about the person.  Is it too obvious a gag to say that the guy on the right may have a Fire Sign on his Ascendant...?  [Image courtesy of the mighty Pink Floyd!]
Even when you’re meeting someone for the very first time, you get some initial sense of part of their overall persona. This social mask that you first see is the business of the First House, and though it’s only an outer layer of personality, and much lies beneath it, it still conveys a lot about the person. And is it too obvious a gag to say that the guy on the right may have a Fire Sign on his Ascendant…? [Image courtesy of the mighty Pink Floyd!]
First House. Think about meeting someone for the first time… They appear in your vicinity. They pause; they look around. They greet someone as you observe. Maybe they then come toward you, hand extended…

Pause right there… What do you know about this person at this point?

Well, you definitely can’t pretend you fully grasp their deepest psychological truths or anything, not yet…but you do actually know a bit about them already. You have some idea about their general appearance: you have some immediate understanding of their size, shape, complexion, hairstyle, clothing choices, demeanor. So right there at the outset of meeting them, you’ve gotten a taste of what we might call their style. And this is what the First House is all about: it’s our style, our appearance, the first impression that we tend to make on the world, and the way that we like to enter situations. The First House describes the social layer that separates our private internal self from society. And we actually have some hand in shaping this House – we work at crafting and revising our social mask all the time! Any Planet placed in H1 is considered to be a more amped-up version of itself, very important for the person in question, and an integral part of the person’s overall presentation and personality.

Second House. This House is all about our possessions, and that definitely includes our money. When we acquire things – whenever we buy, hunt, gather – we’re doing H2 business. The Second House is our physical belongings…and it’s also our attitudes about our physical belongings. What do those belongings mean to us? How do we decide what we actually want to possess? Do we want to acquire things primarily for social status? Sentimental value? Aesthetic appeal? Or do we want the things we want mostly because they’re means to various ends for us? So here’s an important H2 factoid to always keep in mind: our value system itself is actually a part of our H2 affairs. And in a similar vein, consider that in many ways, we possess…ourselves. How we value ourselves therefore fits in here, too. In other words, our self-esteem falls under the H2 heading. The Second House holds our possessions, and it also contains the systems with which we value those possessions. People with Planets placed here may find themselves dealing again and again with issues revolving around wealth versus scarcity, the symbolic importance of possessions, and serious struggles to achieve healthy feelings of self-worth.

Perceiving and interacting with our immediate surroundings is the stuff of the Third House...
Perceiving and interacting with our immediate surroundings is the stuff of the Third House…

Third House. This House is very much about interacting with the local environment. The Third House is where we go when we’re engaging in rational thought, sensory perceptions, communication. When we investigate our surroundings, and when we transmit and/or receive information about those surroundings, we’re doing H3 work. Short journeys also fall here – treks to distant regions are part of a later House, but walking down the street or driving across town are H3 business. A strong H3 signature in a chart can manifest as that person experiencing a recurring need to live on the local scale, to interact with the people and things that are basically there at arm’s length, and to spend a lot of time communicating and fact-gathering. The H3 person may be a quick-thinker, a fast-talker, a speaker or writer, and they may also be of the type who are most adept at the smaller-scale and the shorter-term things in life.

Fourth House. Located at the bottom of a chart, this is the most private House of them all. This is the House of “home.” It speaks of our roots, our origins (whether ethnic, religious, socioeconomic…H4 describes the various strata of these systems into which we’re born). When we withdraw from the public sphere into our own personal domain, we’re retreating into our Fourth House. Very few others are ever allowed a glimpse inside here, and in many ways, our H4 experiences are for us alone. The Fourth House is our “home” in various senses of that word: it’s our sacred inner sanctum, our Fortress of Solitude. Someone with strong planetary placements in H4 might live a life characterized by issues having to do with privacy, with their home life or their close family, with acceptance (or lack of acceptance) of their origins, and with finding the right amount of nurturing (giving and/or receiving) in an ongoing way.

Fifth House. Traditionally known as the House of Children, H5 is concerned with both creation and joy. Fresh romance falls here, as well, as does healthy self-expression. Literal children can be found here, but so, too, can figurative ones, such as works of art that we create, or anything else that we “give birth to” in life. Always remember to keep an eye on that element of joy, though: in the absence of other factors, H5 is a bright, sunshiny place, filled with excitement, and with the exuberance of discovery and of giving voice to our artistic visions and our unique selves. The Fifth House contains our creativity, our bliss, and our work in expressing ourselves to the world. Someone with a strong H5 signature may find that their life is marked by issues having to do with their literal children, or they may regularly encounter situations that either enable them or frustrate them in trying to be creative or to express themselves in various manners. They may also find a recurring theme in life of simply experiencing (or trying to experience) joy in any or all of its myriad forms.

This gardener comes bearing well-honed skills and tools of his trade, and performs all manner of maintenance on a daily basis -- this is someone who is clearly well-acquainted with matters of the Sixth House!
This gardener comes bearing well-honed skills and tools of his trade, and performs all manner of maintenance on a daily basis — this is someone who is clearly well-acquainted with matters of the Sixth House!

Sixth House. The Sixth House is where we perform all of the necessary maintenance that’s required in living life on the physical plane – no easy proposition, and many associated concepts come into play here! Often referred to as the “House of Work,” H6 isn’t about work in the sense of our actual careers – that’s a different House yet to come – it’s more about our approach to work itself. How do we view the need to perform tasks? How do we approach the performance of the tasks themselves? Is necessary work an interesting challenge to us? Is there a sense of sacred duty in it? Or is it just drudgery, best put off for as long as possible in the hopes that someone else will do it? H6 also involves other life-maintenance concepts, as well, such as skills and the honing of them…mentors and teachers in our lives who help us to optimize our H6 experiences…subordinates who handle certain tasks on our behalf. People with significant H6 imprints in their charts may repeatedly come up against issues revolving around the performance of things like chores and tasks and errands…they may be forced into the role of a servant as a recurring theme…they may be called on to perfect some skill or other in life…they may continually bump up against chains of command in various contexts…or they may act as, or search for, a mentor-figure in some important way.

Next time around, we’ll finish off the back half of the field of the 12 Houses…